Slate Roofing Instructional Videos

Underlayment

Alan Buohl of the National Slate Association will explain important aspects of underlayment when installing a slate roof. Refer to page 64 of the NSA manual for further information.

Eave, Gable & Cant Details

Alan Buohl of the National Slate Association will explain important aspects of eave flashing, cant strips, and gable trim. Please refer to page 70 of the NSA Manual for further information.

Slate Roof Layout

Alan Buohl of the National Slate Association will explain the basics on slate roof layout. Please refer to page 56-60 of the NSA Manual for further information.

Cutting & Punching Slate

Alan Buohl of the National Slate Association will explain the basics on how to cut slate with a slate cutter and hammer / stake.

The stake is used for cutting and trimming slate shingles with a slate hammer. The slate to be cut is placed on the top of the stake, with the cut line just to one side of the top edge of the stake. A series of holes is punched along the cut line using the pointed end of a slate hammer. The wasted side of the shingle is then cut off by striking the slate along the cut line with the beveled handle of the slate hammer.

Please refer to NSA Manual for a complete understanding of how to work with slate.

Installing Slate

Alan Buohl of the National Slate Association will give thoughts for a proper installation of a slate roof. Refer to Chapter 3 of the NSA manual, installation details, for further information on underlayments, eave flashing, gable ends, field slates, valley options, hips, and step flashing.

Replacing a Broken Slate

Alan Buohl of the National Slate Association will give thoughts for a proper repair on a broken piece of slate. Refer to pages 213-219 for proper repair recommendations.

Open Valley Install

John Chan of the National Slate Association will explain the details involved installing slate in an open valley. Please refer to page 101 of the NSA Manual for further information.

An open valley with a W-section, or an inverted V, should be used when the pitch of one roof slope adjacent to the valley is greater than the other, or when the roof area drained on one side of the valley is significantly greater than the other side.

Closed Valley Install

John Chan of the National Slate Association will explain the details involved installing slate in a closed valley. Please refer to page 97-100 of the NSA Manual for further information.

Closed valleys often look better and are more watertight when the butt ends of the slates in each course on either side of the valley centerline align. Under no circumstances should the headlap on the roof slope with less pitch be reduced in an effort to get the butt ends to align.

Open Valley Replacement

John Chan of the National Slate Association will explain the details involved replacing slate in an open valley. Please refer to page 97-100 of the NSA Manual for further information.

An open valley with a W-section, or an inverted V, should be used when the pitch of one roof slope adjacent to the valley is greater than the other, or when the roof area drained on one side of the valley is significantly greater than the other side.

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National Slate Association’s Mobile Field Guide

mobile.slateassociation.org is available free of charge via an internet browser on your smart-phone* or tablet when an internet connection is available.Or you may also scan the QR code here with your QR reader.

Click here to download the Mobile Field Guide press release.

*The NSA Mobile Field Guide is best viewed on iPhones, iPads and the newer Android phones. Windows® smart phones are not supported at this time. The mobile site is not intended or formatted for desktop computers or laptops.

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